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Clinical decision making in running form interventions: implications for injury

Clinical Decision Making in Running Form Interventions

Initially written for Medbridge Education

 

The purpose of this article is to highlight the clinical decision making process during kinematic running analyses – focusing on evaluating the kinematic risk factors for running injury and not kinetics.

Both predictive and correlational research attempts to identify kinematic variables that are associated with an individual’s future or current injury.  Many of those being:

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Improving running form course at Runner’s Connect

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Published on: August 29, 2013

I was one of the lecturers at Runner’s Connect Improving Running Form Course.  The other speakers were excellent: Irene Davis, Pete Larson, Brian Heiderscheit, Matt Phillips and Jay Dicharry.

 

You can see the course at Runner’s Connect

 

p.s. I am promoting this because I liked the course content.  I do not get a fee for this promotion.

Strength first, core last: Modifying core training for runners

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Published on: May 18, 2013

front bridge from knees

 

 

Don’t get me wrong.  I love respect the core. But you can’t open a running book, magazine or blog without hearing how important it is for runner’s to train the core.  I agree with this to some extent but for 10 years I have advocated for three points to keep in mind when it comes to runners and core training: (more…)

Ditching the Plank? Strength training is core training.

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Published on: May 18, 2013

Background

The piece was part of a companion piece on resistance and “core” training for runners.  The thrust of that piece was that general resistance training should come first before gut-blasting 5 session/week plank marathon sessions should occur.

Purpose: core exercises are rampant and extremely hyped. They are much too popular and I think many athletes not working with strength coaches focus on the core and perhaps neglect other body parts.  A not at all new thesis is that many simple core exercises can be replaced by compound exercises that have other goals (e.g. train the legs) but still require great core activation.

deadlift down

 

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Static stretching: not evil, not a panacea just a

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Published on: April 4, 2013

This brief post has two main points:

Static stretching is not going to kill your performance

and

Static stretching is not a cure-all

Further, nothing in this post is even remotely new.

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Dear Julie: In defense of the crunch

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Published on: February 14, 2013

Dear Julie,

You wrote an interesting letter on your beautiful website (www.juliewiebept.com) to the coach of your girl’s gymnastic program.  You wished to

 

share with you and your staff how a decade or so of research is transforming our understanding of how we create a strong sturdy center that anchors all of our movements

As a father of two young girls (5 and 3) I really appreciated your views on healthy sports participation, concerns about body issues and the importance of fun in physical activity.  Like you I am also a physiotherapist with a special interest in spine function. I am also a chiropractor, was a spine biomechanics researcher, I completed a MSc in Spine Biomechanics with one of the authors of the references you cited (Stu McGill), I have published a few papers on trunk muscle function (here, here and here) during a variety tasks and was initially very interested in doing research on the lowly and often derided abdominal crunch (here and here).   I love talking about spine stability and how much of this actually old research (I don’t think it’s emerging, most has been around since the 90s) is applied to clinic or sport in ways that the research does not actually support.  I am also a former recreational gymastics coach and regularly “threw back tucks” after two beers at parties well into my twenties. (more…)

Quick EMG Review: Training the rotator cuff trains the scapulothoracic muscles

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Published on: February 8, 2013

I had a discussion with a Physio friend of mine about a blog he wrote championing performing scapular stability exercises before rotator cuff exercises.  Because I am bit of a picky bitch I immediately thought that while I can see the clinical rationale for it I don’t think the muscles actually do this in practice and thus we had a respectable difference of opinion.  From some old EMG reviews I knew that some of the best exercises to train the lower traps (with out upper trap activity) were actually lame old rotator cuff exercises.  A couple of  years ago I made a few graphics that illustrated this (prompted by a similar discussion on Mike Reinold’s blog).

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Golf swing kinematics ebook. Implications for performance, training and injury

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Published on: January 26, 2013

A lot of my previous research (much unpublished) was on golf biomechanics and its the only sport that I am better than average at yet I never write about it.  So to rectify that I have attached an ebook.  Its nothing special, this information is out there, but it does bring a lot together for those interested.

I did a talk last year on this topic and have some of the rough notes I used.  Below is 40 page ebook on the lecture.

The majority of the graphs are my copyright from 3D kinematic data we collected on a study 6 years ago looking at the influence of static stretching on pelvis and thorax kinematics during the swing.  Please feel free to use my pictures however you see fit.

The ebook is a simple overview of how the spine moves during the swing.  It also reviews the academic literature on what kinematic variables of the swing are related to performance and what individual golfer variables are related to performance.  Last, I touch on injury but this is a murky area and I mostly avoid it.  We don’t have a lot of good research on injury mechanism (like most areas) so feel free to make up whatever you like like everyone else does. :)

Here it is:  golf biomechanics ebook compressed

A related link is at the mytpi.com (Titleist Performance Institute) website.  This is one of the best golf biomechanics/fitness websites around.  They have a huge amount of free information and its mostly very good – especially their biomechanics.

The most common targets for corrective exercise and rehabilitation: An introduction to a comprehensive exploration

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Published on: January 18, 2013

Purpose: To prop up for target practice 17 assumed dysfunctions in human movement.  Ideally, each “dysfunction” can be thoroughly critiqued to determine its relevance to ideal or painfree movement.

Why am I so critical?

I am critical of the strong.  There is no point in slamming ridiculous fitness guru’s or fish in the barrel weak-ass chiropractic/rehabilitation theories.  I want to critically evaluate the things that are closest to how I practice and those things that actually seem to dominate big swathes of evidence based practice.  I challenge the strong because the ideas should be able to take it.  If the “dysfunctions” in the post don’t hold up to scrutiny (and some don’t) then we are all the better for it.

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Core stability and low back pain: How stability exercises might help. Part Two

In part one of this post I very simple reviewed some of the ideas behind core stability and how I questioned their relevance to a patient’s pain presentation.  In this follow up post I will briefly review how people with pain have different function than those without pain and give an opinion on how core ‘stability” exercises may help with patients in pain in a manner that has nothing to do with stabilizing the spine.

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